Why don’t the Maximized Living Nutrition Plans recommend Pork & Shellfish?

The Basics

  • Pigs are scavengers (they will eat anything)
  • Pork is highly acidic
  • Pork is toxic
  • Pork is inflammatory
  • Pork carries parasites
  • Pork is linked to numerous health conditions
  • Pork has a less desirable omega 6:3 ratio than grass fed beef
  • Pork is not essential for a healthy diet

Shellfish, more of the same…

  • scavengers, toxic, inflammatory, prone to pathogens, etc

Let’s look at the biblical, the scientific, and the common sense

Could it be that the bible was right?

  • Lev 11:2-3 Of all land animals these are the ones you may eat:
  • any animal that has hoofs you may eat, provided it is cloven-footed and chews the cud.
  • Lev 11:6-7and the pig, which does indeed have hoofs and is cloven-footed, but does not chew the cud and is therefore unclean for you.
  • (New American Bible)
  • Lev 11:9-10 Of the various creatures that live in the water, you may eat the following: whatever in the seas or in river waters has both fins and scales you may eat. But of the various creatures that crawl or swim in the water, whether in the sea or in the rivers, all those that lack either fins or scales are loathsome for you,
  • What else is “unclean”? eagles, vultures, owls, lizards, camels, etc.

The Pig Itself

  • Pigs are scavengers of the earth and will literally eat anything.
  • Pigs have a very unsophisticated digestive system. Whatever they eat (and that could be anything) ends up on their flesh within about 4 hours. Cows on the other hand, “chew the cud” and have a more sophisticated digestive system (4 compartments in their stomach) which breaks down and helps in the detoxification process.
  • Pigs are not the healthiest creatures: fat, lumbering, poor skin, skin lesions, tubercles in the lungs, abcesses in the liver
  • Pigs also have no sweat glands to allow for the release of toxins. Many pigs often have open, oozing sores where the overabundance of toxins manifest.

Parasites

  • Pigs are notorious for the amount of parasites present.   Most of these parasites are heat-resistant. This means that even cooking may not kill them. (Even if they are killed off, you may still be eating dead parasites)
  • One of the biggest concerns with eating pork meat is trichinellosis or trichinosis. This is an infection that humans get from eating undercooked or uncooked pork that contains the larvae of the trichinella worm.
  • When the worm, most often living in cysts in the stomach, is opened due to stomach acids, its larvae are released into the body of the pig. These new worms make their homes in the muscles of the pig.   They remain there even as humans ingest the infected meat flesh.
  • Cysticercosis, lives in pork tissue. The larvae are released, reach maturity, and mate in the intestines, the females producing live larvae. The parasites are then carried from the gastrointestinal tract by the bloodstream to various muscles, where they become encysted.
  • According to Consumer Reports, 69 percent of all raw pork samples tested — nearly 200 samples in total — were contaminated with the dangerous bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica, which causes fever and gastrointestinal illness with diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps. (Ground pork was more likely than pork chops to be contaminated.)
  • It is recommended to freeze pork before cooking to kill off trichinellosis or trichinosis.

Common Conditions Associated with Pork Consumption

  • Cirrhosis of the liver – Pork consumption has a strong epidemiological association with cirrhosis of the liver. Startlingly, pork may be even more strongly associated with alcoholic cirrhosis than alcohol itself!
  • Liver Cancer
  • Multiple Sclerosis – “The correlation between pork consumption and MS prevalence was highly significant. Also, of major significance was the absence of a significant correlation between MS prevalence and beef consumption. This is consistent with the observations that MS is rare in countries where pork is forbidden by religious customs (e.g. Middle East) and has a low prevalence in countries where beef consumption far exceeds pork consumption (e.g. Brazil, Australia).” http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/perfect-health-diet/201202/is-pork-still-dangerous
  • PRRS sometimes referred to as “swine mystery disease,” “blue abortion,” and “swine infertility,” the disease was finally named “Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome” (PRRS), and may afflict about 75 percent of American pig herds. It attacks the pig’s immune system leaving it open to infection (esp. lungs)
  • The Nipah Virus – Deadly for animals and humans, through contact with infected animals. In humans, the virus can lead to deadly encephalitis (an acute inflammation of your brain).
  • Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) – According to a study in the journal Lancet, this virus can spread to people receiving pig organ transplants.
  • Menangle Virus – In 1998, it was reported that a new virus infecting pigs was able to jump to humans. The menangle virus was discovered in August 1997 when sows at an Australian piggery began giving birth to deformed and mummified piglets. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/12/eating-pork.aspx

BEWARE OF PROCESSED MEATS:

  • The World Cancer Research Fund reviewed 7,000 studies and deemed processed meats “too dangerous for human comsumption.” Mainly due to carcinogenic compounds like nitrites and excitotoxins like MSG.
  • Nitrites (keeps meat looking fresh and colorful) but are highly carcinogenic
  • MSG (for flavor and preserving). Also listed as hydrolyzed_________, autolyzed__________, yeast extract.
  • A 2005 study at the University of Hawaii showed a 67% increase in pancreatic cancers in people who eat processed meat.
  • Studies also link nitrites with colorectal cancer and other digestive system cancers.

What are nitrites & MSG in?

  • Bacon   •Jerky   •Sausage   •Hot Dogs   • Sandwich/Deli Meat   •Frozen Meals   •Canned Meats   •etc

 

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